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UD’s Office of Native American Programs (ONAP) administers housing and community development programs that benefit American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments, tribal members, the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, Native Hawaiians, and other Native American organizations. Read more about ONAP’s mission, funding programs, directory, and program accomplishments.

HUD’s Office of Native American Programs (ONAP) administers housing and community development programs that benefit American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments, tribal members, the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, Native Hawaiians, and other Native American organizations.
ONAP’s Mission
To increase the supply of safe, decent, and affordable housing available to Native American families.
To strengthen communities by improving living conditions and creating economic opportunities for tribes and Indian housing residents; and
To ensure fiscal integrity in the operation of the programs it administers.

Training

HUD’s Office of Native American Programs sponsors several tuition free trainings and workshops for Tribal Leaders, Tribal housing staff, Tribal housing board members, housing professionals, community, and nonprofit partners.

Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) Program

The Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) recognizes the right of tribal self-governance and the unique relationship between the federal government and the governments of Indian tribes.

NAHASDA provides annual housing funds to Indian communities through the Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) program. These funds are provided directly to a tribe or a tribally designated housing entity (TDHE). The primary purpose of the IHBG is to provide low-income Indian families with housing assistance.

Eligible IHBG recipients are federally recognized Indian tribes or their TDHE, and a limited number of state recognized tribes that were funded under the Indian Housing Program authorized by the United States Housing Act of 1937 (USHA). With the enactment of NAHASDA, Indian tribes are no longer eligible for assistance under the USHA.

Eligible activities include: housing development, acquisition, new construction, reconstruction, and moderate or substantial rehabilitation of affordable housing; modernization and operating assistance to housing developed under the Indian Housing Program; housing services to eligible families and individuals; housing management services for affordable housing; crime prevention and safety; and model activities that provide creative approaches to solving affordable housing problems.