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Ready Business Program

HURRICANE T O O L K I T

WHY SHOULD ORGANIZATIONS CARE ABOUT HURRICANE RISK?

Significant portions of the United States are at risk for the effects  of tropical storms and hurricanes. It is important that organizations throughout the country, including associations, businesses, and community groups, understand the risks and potential impacts and prepare accordingly.

The Ready Business Program for Hurricane and the Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan allow users to take action to protect employees, protect customers, and help ensure business continuity

 

NATURAL DISASTER IMPACT

IMMEDIATE

40%

OF SMALL

ONE YEAR LATER

25%

MORE SMALL

THREE YEARS LATER

75%

OF BUSINESSES

BUSINESSES WON’T

BUSINESSES

WITHOUT A

REOPEN

WILL CLOSE

CONTINUITY PLAN

 

 

WILL FAIL

Introduction

Should your organization be concerned about tropical storms and hurricanes? In many instances, yes. Many parts of the United States, including Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, Hawaii, parts of the Southwest, Puerto Rico, the Pacific Coast, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and territories in the Pacific may be directly affected by heavy rains, strong winds, wind-driven rain, coastal and inland floods, tornadoes, and coastal storm surges resulting from tropical storms and hurricanes.

The National Hurricane Center reports the greatest threat to life and property along the coasts are storm surge and large waves caused by hurricanes. In addition, heavy rainfall can result in extensive flooding, including inland flooding. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, inland flooding accounts for more than 50 percent of hurricane-related deaths each year. Furthermore hurricane- force winds and windborne debris from tropical storms and hurricanes can destroy buildings and mobile homes and pose a major risk to people and property.

If your organization is vulnerable to hurricanes, it is important that you understand your risk, develop a preparedness and mitigation plan, and take action. Doing so will not only increase the safety of employees and customers, but it will help you remain in business after disasters, such as tropical storms and hurricanes, strike. Maintaining business continuity is important. When you are able to continue operations after a disaster, you also improve your community’s ability to recover.

 

Identify Your Risk

 

Develop a Plan

 

Take Action

 

Be Recognized and Inspire Others

 

 

Following these steps in the Ready Business Program as a part of your overall business continuity planning will help protect assets (people, property, operations); sustain the capability to provide goods and services to customers and/or supply chain; maintain cash flow; preserve competitive advantage and reputation; and provide the ability to meet legal, regulatory, financial, and contractual obligations.

Nonprofit organizations can also benefit from the Ready Business Program as business continuity will protect staff, clients, and property while allowing operations to continue.

Experts estimate that 75 percent of businesses without continuity planning will fail within three years of a disaster. The Ready Business Program offers information to complete continuity planning, including resources from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Business Continuity Plan website

Once completed, the Ready Business Program will provide you with the tools to plan, take action, and become a Ready Business by addressing preparedness and mitigation for your STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, STRUCTURE, and SERVICE. And you will also have the opportunity to apply for recognition as a member of the Ready Business Community.

Organizations can achieve six levels for recognition through the Ready Business Program. The levels include STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, STRUCTURE, and SERVICE. The first five levels can be achieved either independently or as a group. The SERVICE level is achieved by completing requirements for STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, and STRUCTURE levels in addition to the SERVICE requirements.

STAFF includes planning and preparedness activities for the protection of your staff.

 

SURROUNDINGS includes those elements that potentially pose a threat during an event, such as fences, flagpoles, and trees.

SPACE includes the contents of your workspace, such as inventory, filing cabinets, shelving, and other furniture.

SYSTEMS includes utility systems that support the operation of the building and are generally located on the roof.

STRUCTURE includes architectural and structural elements of the building, especially construction types that may be vulnerable to damage or failure during an event.

SERVICE includes the opportunities for your organization to engage and serve the community following an event. You may only qualify for SERVICE to others after you have prepared your own organization first.

It is important to remember that injury, damage, concurrent damage, cascading disasters such as fire following the event, business interruption, or even increased repair or recovery costs can come from failure to prepare or mitigate. As a result, the first step in the Ready Business Program is to complete a Back-to-Business Self-Assessment to identify vulnerabilities from any source.

The Ready Business Program is intended to recognize and acknowledge organizations who complete preparedness and mitigation actions to protect employees, customers, and continuity. You can get started today by following the steps provided.

For more information or assistance, contact ReadyBusiness@flash.org or (877) 221-7233.

IDENTIFY YOUR RISK

Complete the Back-to-Business Self-Assessment to determine the specific areas your

organization needs to address to prepare, mitigate risk, and return to operation following a disaster.

DEVELOP A PLAN
  1. Based on the information in the Back-to-Business Self-Assessment, complete the Ready Business Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan for STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, STRUCTURE, and SERVICE to identify preparedness and mitigation actions needed to ensure safety and business (Note: Completing this plan is a critical first step toward recognition as a Ready Business.)
  2. Review the Quick Reference Guide to determine which preparedness and mitigation actions to take based on the potential impacts to your business.
  3. If you need assistance with Ready Business planning, contact your local emergency management office to discuss local hazards, identify local best practices in disaster safety and resilience, or connect with other Ready Businesses in your area.
TAKE ACTION
  1. Now that you’ve created your Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan, make sure the building owner approves it if you are leasing or renting your building. (Note: Be sure to check with your local building department to secure required permits prior to performing any retrofitting or other mitigation activity.)
  2. Perform preparedness and mitigation activities as prioritized in the Preparedness and Mitigation Project Document your actions as instructed in the applications for STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, STRUCTURE, and SERVICE with signatures, photographs, receipts, or letters from an organization manager, engineer, or design professional, as applicable.
BE RECOGNIZED AND INSPIRE OTHERS
  1. Complete the application at the end of the program for recognition as a Ready

After you have completed these steps, you will be eligible to become a member of the Ready Business Community, and will enjoy the peace of mind of knowing you have done your part to promote safety, mitigate potential loss, and protect your organization

1. Identify Your Risk:

 

 

 

1. Can your organization operate without any of the following: computers, copier, fax machine, files, inventory, or special equipment (e.g., x-ray equipment, cash register, credit card readers)?

q  Yes

q  No

Ready Business Program – SYSTEMS

2. Can your organization operate without any of the following: gas, power, water, internet, or telecommunications?

q  Yes

q  No

Ready Business Program – SYSTEMS

3. Can you still operate your organization without access to the damaged building(s)?

q  Yes

q  No

Ready Business Program – STRUCTURE

STAFF/CUSTOMERS/VENDORS/SUPPLIERS (PEOPLE)

4. Can you meet payroll if your business income is interrupted? If yes, estimate how long.

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – PEOPLE

5. Are your employees able to commute to work?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – PEOPLE

IMPACT ON YOUR ORGANIZATION

6. Is your organization easily accessible to the public, your customers, and employees (e.g., parking)?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – PEOPLE

7. Are you communicating status with employees, key customers, vendors, and suppliers throughout your recovery?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – PEOPLE

 

OPERATIONS

8. Can your organization operate without access to the damaged buildings?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – OPERATIONS

9. Have you set priorities on what operations your organization needs to recover 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – OPERATIONS

10. Are your suppliers up and running or do you have sufficient parts/supplies on hand to continue without resupply?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – OPERATIONS

11. Are you able to ship your product or provide services to your customers based on your current impacts, understanding that the demand for these products or services may drastically change?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – OPERATIONS

12. Will you still have all your customers/clients after the disaster?

q  Yes

q  No

Business Continuity Plan – OPERATIONS

OVERALL OPERATIONS

13. Can your organization survive losses if it is closed and/ or inaccessible for 3 to 7 days?

q  Yes

q  No

Ready Business Program & Business Continuity Plan

For each question, 1-13, that you answered ‘No’, address the specific issue in the Ready Business Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan, or in your Business Continuity Plan.

Identify Your Risk Download

2. Develop A Plan

  1. Based on the information in the completed Back-to-Business Self-Assessment, create a Ready Business Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan for your STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, STRUCTURE, and SERVICE to identify critical preparedness and mitigation actions needed to ensure safety and business Completing this plan will bring you one step closer to recognition as a Ready Business.
  2. Review the Quick Reference Guide to determine which preparedness and mitigation actions to take based on the potential impacts to your
  3. If you need assistance with Ready Business planning, contact your local emergency management office to discuss local hazards, identify local best practices in disaster safety and resilience, or connect with other Ready Businesses in your area.

     

STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, STRUCTURE, AND SERVICE

After you have identified the potential hurricane risks and determined the possible impacts on your organization, create a Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan and decide which solutions you will use to reduce risks. The Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan will support the business continuity planning and readiness process and bring you one step closer to recognition as a Ready Business.

READY BUSINESS PREPAREDNESS AND MITIGATION PROJECT PLAN

Organization:

Project Lead:

Name:

Title/Department:

Address:

Phone Number:

Email:

Executive Summary:

Background: (Provide a summary description of risk to include priorities)

Goals and Objectives:

STAFF

Below is a list of key preparedness measures your organization can complete to help your staff get prepared for a hurricane event; however, the list is not all-inclusive. In addition, even if you are required to evacuate, being prepared allows you to stay in contact with your staff and provides a sense of comfort that your organization will be able to reopen after the disaster. For additional guidance on preparedness measures, please see the Quick Reference Guide: STAFF in this program.

By performing steps one through six, organizations will be eligible for recognition as a Ready Business – STAFF. The Suggested Actions are recommended, but not required, for recognition.

PREPAREDNESS ACTION

ASSIGNED TO

BUDGET

COMPLETION

DATE

1

 

Develop Business Continuity and Crisis Communications Plans

 

 

 

2

 

Conduct an Employee Awareness Campaign

 

 

 

3

 

Develop an Employee Sheltering/ Evacuation plan and include an Emergency Supply Kit

 

 

 

4

 

Conduct an Employee Training Session

 

 

 

5

 

Conduct a Hurricane Drill

 

 

 

6

 

Review Insurance Coverage (including Flood Insurance)/Create Inventory (Note: See call out box on page 15 regarding special information on flood insurance.)

 

 

 

SUGGESTED ACTION:

Develop an Employee Shelter/Evacuation Plan and Include an Emergency Supply Kit

 

 

 

SUGGESTED ACTION:

Purchase a NOAA Weather Radio for Monitoring During an Event/Download a Mobile Alerting App

 

 

 

SURROUNDINGS

FLOOD INSURANCE IS CRITICAL FOR BUSINESSES AND EMPLOYEES ALIKE

Did you know that homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flood? The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was developed to help provide a means for property owners to financially protect themselves. The NFIP offers flood insurance to homeowners, renters, and business owners if their community participates in the NFIP. Participating communities agree to adopt and enforce ordinances that meet or exceed FEMA requirements to reduce the risk of flooding. The average flood insurance policy costs about $700 per year. To learn more about the NFIP and flood insurance in your area, visit FloodSmart

Below is a list of nonstructural hurricane mitigation activities that can be completed by a professional landscaper/ tradesman or professional engineer; however, the list is not all-inclusive. For additional guidance on nonstructural risks, please see the Quick Reference Guide: SURROUNDINGS in this program.

By performing all applicable activities, organizations will be eligible for recognition as a Ready Business – SURROUNDINGS

SURROUNDINGS

RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

ASSIGNED TO

BUDGET

COMPLETION

DATE

Signs

Reinforce signs to withstand expected wind pressures or remove prior to event.

 

 

 

Flagpoles

Secure flagpole(s) to withstand expected wind pressures or remove prior to event.

 

 

 

Landscaping/Trees

Consult a professional landscaper and develop a plan for hurricane-resilient landscaping.

 

 

 

Fences

Ensure fencing is installed securely.

 

 

 

Floodwalls and Levees

Consult with a floodplain manager or professional engineer regarding land use or code restrictions/requirements in your area. If elevating

the structure or performing floodproofing techniques is not feasible, then consider designing floodwalls or levees on the property to attempt to repel floodwaters.

 

 

 

Space

Below is a list of nonstructural mitigation activities that can be completed by someone with common tools and readily available materials; however, the list is not all-inclusive. For additional guidance on mitigating these nonstructural risks, please see the Quick Reference Guide: SPACE in this program.

By performing all mitigation activities, organizations will be eligible for recognition as a Ready Business – SPACE.

NONSTRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

ASSIGNED TO

BUDGET

COMPLETION DATE

Contents

Determine and relocate your critical contents at least

one foot above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) or the Design Flood Elevation (DFE), whichever is higher.

 

 

 

Chemicals

Establish a method for safeguarding chemicals in your Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan.

 

 

 

SYSTEMS

Below is a list of nonstructural mitigation activities that may require a professional engineer to identify and evaluate appropriate mitigation steps; however, the list is not all-inclusive. For additional guidance on nonstructural risks, please see the Quick Reference Guide: SYSTEMS in this program.

By performing all retrofit items, organizations will be eligible for recognition as a Ready Business – SYSTEMS.

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SYSTEMS RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

ASSIGNED TO

BUDGET

COMPLETION DATE

Mechanical Systems

Consult a professional engineer or licensed professional trained in each system to ensure all systems and connections are designed to resist the expected wind loads and

uplift and to develop solutions for protecting vital systems through elevation, anchoring, or other approved means.

 

 

 

Fuel Tanks/Systems

 

 

 

Electrical Systems

 

 

 

Communications Equipment

 

 

 

Lightning Protection Systems

 

 

 

Utility Connections

 

 

 

Antennas

 

 

 

Other Rooftop Structures

 

 

 

Sewer and Water Management Systems

 

 

 

Potable Water Systems

 

 

 

STRUCTURE.

Assessing structural and complex nonstructural risk requires the services of a professional engineer or other design professional to accurately evaluate and design reasonable mitigation measures. Below is a list of mitigation solutions; however, the list is not all-inclusive. For additional guidance on structural risks, please see the Quick Reference Guide: STRUCTURE in this program.

By performing a minimum of one retrofit item on this list, organizations will be eligible for recognition as a Ready Business – STRUCTURE.

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

ASSIGNED TO

BUDGET

COMPLETION DATE

Continuous Load Path – Foundation

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate elevation and continuous load path.

 

 

 

Roof Systems

Consult a professional engineer and design the roof to withstand the expected wind loads, uplift, and water intrusion. Create a continuous load path, consider the integrity of roof coverings and decking, and install flashing to minimize water intrusion through vents or other openings.

 

 

 

Skylights

Upgrade to pressure-related, impact-resistant skylights.

 

 

 

Gable-End Bracing

Consult a professional to properly brace the gable-end walls.

 

 

 

Soffits

Consult a professional and ensure that soffits are properly supported.

 

 

 

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

ASSIGNED TO

BUDGET

COMPLETION DATE

Best Available Refuge Area (BARA)

Consult a professional engineer to determine your BARA if a tornado shelter is not installed.

 

Note: Do not plan to shelter- in-place if your structure is in a flood or storm surge evacuation zone.

 

 

 

Elevation

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate elevating your structure so the lowest floor is at or above the BFE or DFE, whichever is higher.

 

 

 

Wet Floodproofing

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate options for wet floodproofing the structure.

 

 

 

Dry Floodproofing

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate options for dry floodproofing the structure.

 

 

 

 

Service

Can your organization provide community service to others following a disaster? Identify and build local relationships to create a SERVICE component in your Business Continuity Plan. For additional guidance on the SERVICE component, please see the Quick Reference Guide: SERVICE in this program.

By performing all applicable preparedness activities in STAFF and mitigation actions in SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, and STRUCTURE, organizations will be eligible for recognition as a Ready Business – SERVICE.

SERVICE ACTION

ASSIGNED TO

BUDGET

COMPLETION DATE

Contact Your Local Emergency Management Office

 

 

 

Identify Ways to Engage and Participate in Your Community

 

 

 

 

 

RELIEF KITS

 

CHARGING STATION

 

FOOD PREPARATION

 

 

VOLUNTEER

If your organization is open after the disaster, you could become a distributor or storage warehouse

for Disaster Relief Kits. Providing a place for the supplies to be stored locally allows volunteer organizations to readily distribute them throughout affected areas.

Does your organization have electricity after the disaster? If so, you may want to become a

volunteer charging station. Provide a safe, secure place for emergency responders, volunteers, and community members to charge their cell phones, power wheelchairs, and battery-powered tools.

Does your organization have the capability to prepare or serve meals?

Providing a sanitary kitchen for emergency responders, volunteers, or community members to prepare or receive meals following a disaster is essential for rebuilding the community.

Not sure how your organization can directly contribute after the disaster? Volunteer.

Contact your Local Emergency Manager and determine where volunteer opportunities exist in the community. You could prepare meals, sort debris, or even work at a local office of a volunteer organization. For additional ideas, visit National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster.

Quick reference guide

PREPAREDNESS ACTION

PREPAREDNESS SOLUTIONS

PREPAREDNESS RESOURCES

 

 

 

 

STEP 1:

Develop Business Continuity and Crisis Communications Plans

Create a Business Continuity Plan that includes strategies for storing critical business documents and data.

 

 

Business Continuity Plan

Consult the Disaster Resistant Business Toolkit.

 

Disaster Resistant Business (DRB) Toolkit

Assign a Business Continuity Team Leader responsible for implementing the Business Continuity Plan to bring your organization back to business after an event.

 

Business Continuity Plan

Create a Crisis Communications Plan that includes internal and external communication protocols for before, during, and after a disaster.

 

 

    

 

Crisis Communications

PREPAREDNESS ACTION

PREPAREDNESS SOLUTIONS

PREPAREDNESS RESOURCES

 

STEP 2:

Conduct an Employee Awareness Campaign

Conduct an employee awareness campaign to educate staff on disaster safety.

 

The awareness campaign should include educating staff on the safest response before, during, and after

a hurricane, including definitions of National Hurricane Center (NHC) terms, e.g., tropical storm/hurricane watch vs. warning. Address shelter locations, emergency communication plans and policies, when to evacuate (when advised), seeking high ground for flash flooding, and avoiding entering flood waters. The campaign should also provide guidance on critical actions after a hurricane event.

 

Advise employees to learn their BFE by visiting the online FEMA Flood Map Service Center, contacting their insurance company, or calling their local floodplain management department.

 

Reference How to Prepare for a Hurricane for additional content.

 

How to Prepare for a Hurricane.

Prepareathon

 

 

FEMA Flood Map Service Center.

PREPAREDNESS ACTION

PREPAREDNESS SOLUTIONS

PREPAREDNESS RESOURCES

 

STEP 3:

Develop an Employee Training Program

Develop a training program that provides activities for employee engagement before, during, and after a hurricane. Your training can be incorporated into established

campaigns like National Preparedness Month and should focus on disaster preparedness and safety. Drills or exercises should be incorporated into the program. Include Turn Around, Don’t Drown! into your messaging.

 

Prepare Your Organization for a Hurricane Playbook. Prepareathon

 

Turn Around, Don’t Drown!

 

STEP 4:

Conduct an Employee Training Session

Hold a preparedness discussion with your staff. Discuss what you have done to prepare for disasters, review your Business Continuity Plan, review your Crisis Communication Plan, and share awareness campaign key messages.

Use the Prepare Your Organization for a Hurricane Playbook to facilitate this discussion and engage your employees.

 

The discussion should:

 

• Educate the employees about your business continuity and crisis communications plans;

 

• Include basic first aid and CPR training; and,

 

• Describe evacuation and sheltering plans.

 

Prepare Your Organization for a Hurricane Playbook. Prepareathon

SURROUNDINGS

SURROUNDINGS RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

Signs

Consult a professional landscaper, and develop a plan for your surroundings that mitigates against damage from hurricanes by removing dead branches and other potential projectiles or falling trees.

 

 

 

 

Remove Trees and Potential Windborne Missiles: Protecting Your Property from High Winds

Flagpoles

Landscaping/Trees

Fences

Floodwalls and Levees

Consult with a floodplain manager or professional engineer regarding land use or code restrictions/requirements in your area. If elevating the structure or performing floodproofing techniques is not feasible, then consider designing floodwalls or levees on the property to attempt to repel floodwaters.

 

 

 

 

FEMA P-936, Floodproofing Non- Residential Buildings.

 

FEMA P-259, Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood- Prone Residential Structures.

SPACE RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

Contents

Determine and relocate your critical contents at least one foot above the BFE or the DFE, whichever is higher.

FEMA P-936, Floodproofing Non- Residential Buildings.

Chemicals

Establish a method for safeguarding chemicals in your Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan.

 

Emergency Response Plan

SYSTEMS RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

Mechanical Systems

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate and design structural

connections to resist the expected wind loads and provide uplift resistance.

 

Additionally, consult a professional to evaluate and design for the following flood mitigation techniques:

 

• Elevate service equipment at least 12-inches above BFE.

Use platforms or pedestals for equipment installed on the ground.

 

• Relocate equipment to an existing location above the BFE.

 

• Protect the equipment in place with floodwalls, shields, or anchors and tie-downs.

 

Protect drainage systems with backflow valves. Consult a professional plumber for proper installation of these devices.

 

FEMA P-424, Design  Guide for Improving School Safety in Earthquakes, Floods, and High Winds.

 

 

 

FEMA P-259, Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood- Prone Residential Structures.

FEMA P-936, Floodproofing Non- Residential Buildings.

Fuel Tanks/Systems

Electrical Systems

Communications Systems

Lightning Protection Systems

Utility Connections

Antenna

Other Rooftop Structures

Sewer and Water Management Systems

Potable Water Systems

Structure

The International Code Council’s International Building Code (IBC) addresses construction methods for most commercial structures as well as residential structures that are not covered by the International Residential Code. The IBC contains both prescriptive and engineered provisions, and applies to the many different types of commercial structures.

It is important to note that the recommendations in this document are general and are intended to highlight areas of a structure that could be strengthened against hurricanes. However, the recommendations cannot account for all of the different building types and variables in the IBC. As a result, a licensed professional is necessary to identify and perform mitigation activity appropriate for your organization

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

Skylights

Upgrade to pressure-rated, impact-resistant skylights.

FEMA P-424, Design  Guide for Improving School Safety in Earthquakes, Floods, and High Winds.

Gable-End Bracing

Hire a professional to brace any gable-end walls taller than 4 feet so that loads on the gable-end walls are distributed over multiple roof trusses or rafters.

 

Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction

Technical Fact Sheet Series

FEMA P-499 / December 2010

 

 

FEMA P-499, Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction.

Soffits

Proper attachment is the most common cause of soffit failures. This can be addressed by installing wood backing or supports as an attachment point for soffits. If it is not possible to install wood supports, the soffit should be secured at 12-inch intervals on each side to limit flexing during high-wind events.

 

Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction

Technical Fact Sheet Series

FEMA P-499 / December 2010

 

 

FEMA P-499, Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction.

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

Skylights

Upgrade to pressure-rated, impact-resistant skylights.

FEMA P-424, Design  Guide for Improving School Safety in Earthquakes, Floods, and High Winds.

Gable-End Bracing

Hire a professional to brace any gable-end walls taller than 4 feet so that loads on the gable-end walls are distributed over multiple roof trusses or rafters.

 

Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction

Technical Fact Sheet Series

FEMA P-499 / December 2010

 

 

FEMA P-499, Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction.

Soffits

Proper attachment is the most common cause of soffit failures. This can be addressed by installing wood backing or supports as an attachment point for soffits. If it is not possible to install wood supports, the soffit should be secured at 12-inch intervals on each side to limit flexing during high-wind events.

 

Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction

Technical Fact Sheet Series

FEMA P-499 / December 2010

 

 

FEMA P-499, Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction.

 

STRUCTURAL RISKS

 

MITIGATION SOLUTION

 

 

REFERENCES

Gutters and Downspouts

Install noncombustible systems designed for high- wind speeds that provide uplift resistance.

  
   

 FEMA P-424, Design Guide or Improving School Safety in

Earthquakes, Floods, and High Winds.

Wall Systems

Consult a professional engineer to design walls to withstand high-wind loads, provide uplift resistance, and prevent water intrusion. Consider the many features that define a wall, including structure, covering, and openings. Address the wall as a system, ensuring the following design/mitigation measures are included:

 

• Wall Structure

 

• Wall Sheathing

 

• House Wrap

 

• Wall Coverings

 

• Flashing Around Openings

 

 Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction

Technical Fact Sheet Series

FEMA P-499 / December 2010

  

FEMA P-499, Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction.

 

 

 

 

Secure Metal Siding and Metal Roofs: Protecting Your Property rom High Winds 

Maintain EIFS Walls: Protecting Your Property from High Winds

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

 

Openings

 

• Garage/Rolling Doors

• Windows

• Exterior Doors

• Install pressure-rated, impact-resistant garage doors or brace existing doors with assemblies designed to increase pressure ratings.

 

• Install pressure-rated, impact-resistant windows, or protect with tested and approved opening protection. If these options are not available, as a temporary measure use 5/8-inch or greater

plywood, cut to fit and ready to install, and do not use tape, as it does not protect against broken glass.

 

• Install pressure-rated, impact-resistant exterior doors.

 

• Ensure flashing and weather stripping around the windows and doors is designed/installed to protect against water intrusion from wind-driven rain.

 

Reinforce or Replace Garage Doors: Protecting Your Property from High Winds

 

 

Protect Windows and Doors with Covers: Protecting Your Property from High Winds

 

 

Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction

Technical Fact Sheet Series

FEMA P-499 / December 2010

 

 

FEMA P-499, Home Builder’s Guide to Coastal Construction.

 

FEMA P-424, Design  Guide for Improving School Safety in Earthquakes, Floods, and High Winds.

 

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

 

Canopies, Awnings, and Carports

Add metal connectors to meet or exceed expected wind loads. For the carport, consider placing connectors:

 

1. Between supporting roof members and horizontal beams;

 

2. At each beam-to-column connection; and

 

3. At each column-to-foundation connection.

FEMA P-804, Wind Retrofit Guide for Residential Buildings.

 

Safe Room or Shelter

Install a safe room or shelter that is constructed using FEMA guidance or that meets ICC/NSSA 500 standards in an area safe from flooding.

 

Reference FEMA P-361 and Quick Guide Flood Hazard Elevation and Siting Criteria for Community Safe Rooms for additional information about flood elevation and siting criteria for community safe rooms.

 

Note: If the structure is located in a flood zone, safe rooms and shelters are not recommended.

FEMA P-361, Safe Rooms for Tornadoes and Hurricanes: Guidance for Community and Residential Safe Rooms.

 

FEMA P-320, Taking Shelter from the Storm: Building a Safe Room for Your Home or Small Business.

 

ICC/NSSA 500-2014: Standard for the Design and Construction of Storm Shelters.

 

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

 

Safe Room or Shelter

   
  

Quick Guide Flood Hazard Elevation and Siting Criteria for Community Safe Rooms

 

BARA

Consult a professional engineer to determine your BARA if a tornado shelter is not installed.

 

Note: Do not plan to shelter-in-place if your structure is in a flood or storm surge evacuation zone.

  
  

FEMA P-431, Tornado Protection: Selecting Refuge Areas in Buildings

 

Elevation

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate elevating your structure so the lowest floor is at or above the BFE or DFE, whichever is higher.

  
  

Residential Construction for Coastal Areas: Building on Strong and Safe Foundations

 

FEMA P-312, Homeowner’s Guide to Retrofitting

 

Wet Floodproofing

Wet floodproofing is a technique that allows flood waters to enter the structure.

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate options for wet floodproofing the structure. Consider the following items when wet floodproofing:

• Wet floodproofing is not typically done in climate controlled areas.

• All materials used should be resistant to damage from flood waters.

• Wet floodproofing does not protect the structure from flowing water, erosion, scour, debris or damage to contents.

• Post-flood clean-up should be considered before using wet floodproofing techniques.

 

.gov

.gov

  

 

       www.ready

 

FEMA P-936, Floodproofing Non-Residential Buildings

 

FEMA P-259, Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood- Prone Residential Structures.

 

 

       www.ready

 

FEMA P-936, Floodproofing Non-Residential Buildings

 

FEMA P-259, Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood- Prone Residential Structures.

 

 

 

 

STRUCTURAL RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

 

Wet Floodproofing

• Installation of properly sized and placed wall openings, below the expected flood level.

 

By allowing water to enter the structure, you may cause a secondary issue with protection of systems. Reference the SYSTEMS section to mitigate these items.

  

Dry Floodproofing

Dry floodproofing is a technique that prevents the entry of water into the structure. Dry floodproofing should only be considered in instances where the flood waters are expected to last a short duration and a depth of less than three feet.

 

Because the walls are exposed to floodwaters and the pressures they exert, dry floodproofing is recommended only for structures with walls

constructed of flood-resistant materials and depths are low.

 

Consult a professional engineer to evaluate options for dry floodproofing the structure. Consider the following items when dry floodproofing:

 

• All exterior walls of the structure must be sealed and possibly reinforced.

 

• All openings below BFE must be permanently sealed or have enhanced flood shields installed.

 

• Protected from seepage.

 

• Anchoring of structure to resist floatation and lateral movement.

 

• Selecting and designing proper drainage systems to eliminate excess hydrostatic loads.

 

• Design watertight core areas to protect vital systems if dry floodproofing the entire structure is not possible.

 

            on- Residential Buildings.

 

FEMA P-259, Engineering Principles and Practices for Retrofitting Flood- Prone Residential Structures.

 

SERVICE ACTION

MITIGATION SOLUTION

REFERENCES

 

Contact Your Local Emergency

Management Office

Contact your local emergency management office to identify emergency management personnel and resources in your area.

Emergency Management Agencies

 
 

Contact your local emergency management office during your disaster planning to learn how you may provide service(s) before and after a disaster strikes. Include this information in your Business Continuity Plan.

  

Identify Ways to Engage and Participate in

Your Community

In addition to preparing your organization, it is important to understand your local and tribal community emergency operation plans and to work with other organizations in your community or tribe. Opportunities to participate in whole community planning include the following:

 

• Learn about public-private partnerships.

 

• Participate in local or tribal organizations that make your community a safer and more prepared place to live and do business, such as your local Citizen Corps Council, hazard mitigation planning team, or local and tribal Community Emergency Response Team (CERT).

 

• Citizen Corps Council includes representatives from all sectors of the community. This whole community membership helps to ensure the community perspective is reflected in local emergency management practices.

Prepare Your Organization for a Hurricane Playbook.

Prepareathon

 
       

3.  Take Action

  1. Make sure that your Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan is approved by the building owner if you are leasing or renting your Always check with your local building department to secure required permits prior to performing any retrofitting or other mitigation activity.
  2. Perform preparedness and mitigation activities as prioritized in the Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan. Document your preparedness and mitigation as instructed in the applications for STAFF, SURROUNDINGS, SPACE, SYSTEMS, STRUCTURE, and SERVICE with signatures, photographs, receipts, or letters from an organization manager, engineer, or design

PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS

ACCOMPLISHED

INITIAL/DATE OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

1

 

Developed Business Continuity and Crisis Communication Plans

Must be completed to receive recognition

2

 

Conducted an Employee Awareness Campaign

Must be completed to receive recognition

 

3

 

Developed an Employee Training Program

Must be completed to receive recognition

 

4

 

Conducted an Employee Training Session

Must be completed to receive recognition

 

5

 

Conducted a Hurricane Drill

Must be completed to receive recognition

 

6

Reviewed Insurance Coverage

(Including Flood Insurance)/Created Inventory

Must be completed to receive recognition

 

SUGGESTED ACTION:

Developed an Employee Sheltering/Evacuation Plan and Included an Emergency Supply Kit

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

SUGGESTED ACTION:

Purchased a NOAA Weather Radio for Monitoring During an Event/Downloaded a Mobile Alerting App

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

space

SURROUNDINGS RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

ACCOMPLISHED

INSERT PHOTO OR RECEIPT

Signs

Reinforced signs to withstand expected wind pressures or removed prior to event.

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

Flagpoles

Secured flagpole(s) to withstand expected wind pressures or removed prior to event.

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

Landscaping/Trees

Consulted a professional landscaper and developed a plan for hurricane-resilient landscaping.

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

Fences

Ensured fencing is installed securely.

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

Floodwalls and Levees

Consulted with a floodplain manager or professional engineer regarding land use or code restrictions/requirements in your area. If elevating the structure

or performing floodproofing techniques is not feasible, then consider designing floodwalls or levees on the property to attempt to repel floodwaters.

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

SPACE RISKS

MITIGATION SOLUTION

ACCOMPLISHED

INSERT PHOTO OR RECEIPT

Contents

Determined and relocated all critical contents at least one foot above the BFE or DFE, whichever is higher.

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

Chemicals

Established a method for safeguarding chemicals in your Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan.

q  Yes

q  No

q  Not Applicable

 

download

Emergency preparedness

An estimated 25 percent of businesses don’t open again after a major disaster, according to the Institute for Business and Home Safety. Protect your small business by identifying the risks relevant to your location, both natural and man-made. Then, keep your plan of action updated.

Preserve your equipment and business records by referencing this IRS guide on protecting your information before an emergency strikes. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) also offers an emergency preparedness checklist and toolkit.

Storefronts of three open businesses and one closed business.

Specific disaster checklists and tips

Focus on disasters that pose a realistic risk to your small business. Consult the following resources to lessen the financial impact of disasters and reopen your business quickly.

Hurricanes

Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 to November 30. Hurricanes:

  • Can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans.
  • Can affect areas more than 100 miles inland.
  • Are most active in September.

IF YOU ARE UNDER A HURRICANE WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Determine how best to protect yourself from high winds and flooding.
    • Evacuate if told to do so.
    • Take refuge in a designated storm shelter, or an interior room for high winds.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.
  • Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters.

Storm Surge

Storm surge is water from the ocean that is pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds swirling around a hurricane. Storm surge is fast and can produce extreme coastal and inland flooding. When hurricanes cause storm surge, over 20 feet of water can be produced and pushed towards the shore and several miles inland destroying property and endangering lives in its path.

Be Informed

  • Storm surge is historically the leading cause of hurricane-related deaths in the United States.
  • Water weighs about 1,700 pounds per cubic yard, so battering waves from surge can easily demolish buildings and cause massive destruction along the coast.
  • Storm surge undermines roads and foundations when it erodes material out from underneath them.
  • Just one inch of water can cause $25,000 of damage to your home. Homeowners and renter’s insurance do not typically cover flood damage.

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk of hurricanes.
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • If you are at risk for flash flooding, watch for warning signs such as heavy rain.
  • Practice going to a safe shelter for high winds, such as a FEMA safe room or ICC 500 storm shelter. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room in a sturdy building on the lowest level that is not subject to flooding.
  • Based on your location and community plans, make your own plans for evacuation or sheltering in place.
  • Become familiar with your evacuation zone, the evacuation route, and shelter locations.
  • Gather needed supplies for at least three days. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of pets.
  • Keep important documents in a safe place or create password-protected digital copies.
  • Protect your property. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves in plumbing to prevent backups. Consider hurricane shutters. Review insurance policies.

When a hurricane is 36 hours from arriving

  • Turn on your TV or radio in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
  • Restock your emergency preparedness kit. Include food and water sufficient for at least three days, medications, a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies.
  • Plan how to communicate with family members if you lose power. For example, you can call, text, email or use social media. Remember that during disasters, sending text messages is usually reliable and faster than making phone calls because phone lines are often overloaded.
  • Review your evacuation zone, evacuation route and shelter locations. Plan with your family. You may have to leave quickly so plan ahead.
  • Keep your car in good working condition, and keep the gas tank full; stock your vehicle with emergency supplies and a change of clothes.
  • If you have NFIP flood insurance, your policy may cover up to $1000 in loss avoidance measures, like sandbags and water pumps, to protect your insured property. You should keep copies of all receipts and a record of the time spent performing the work. They should be submitted to your insurance adjuster when you file a claim to be reimbursed. Visit www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/137860 to learn more.

When a hurricane is 18-36 hours from arriving

  • Bookmark your city or county website for quick access to storm updates and emergency instructions.
  • Bring loose, lightweight objects inside that could become projectiles in high winds (e.g., patio furniture, garbage cans); anchor objects that would be unsafe to bring inside (e.g., propane tanks); and trim or remove trees close enough to fall on the building.
  • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” exterior grade or marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install.

When a hurricane is 6-18 hours from arriving

  • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
  • Charge your cell phone now so you will have a full battery in case you lose power.

When a hurricane is 6 hours from arriving

  • If you’re not in an area that is recommended for evacuation, plan to stay at home or where you are and let friends and family know where you are.
  • Close storm shutters, and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
  • Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary. If you lose power, food will last longer. Keep a thermometer in the refrigerator to be able to check the food temperature when the power is restored.
  • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

Survive DURING

  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Do not drive around barricades.
  • If sheltering during high winds, go to a FEMA safe room, ICC 500 storm shelter, or a small, interior, windowless room or hallway on the lowest floor that is not subject to flooding.
  • If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising flood water.
  • Listen for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery outdoors ONLY and away from windows.
  • Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Don’t Drown! Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Listen to authorities for information and special instructions.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.
  • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Document any property damage with photographs. Contact your insurance company for assistance.
 
 
 

Associated Content

Hurricane Seasonal Preparedness Digital Toolkit

This digital toolkit contains social media posts and links to graphics/videos hurricane preparedness and improve clear actionable information for individual and community preparedness.

What you should know about Hurricanes

Graphics, videos & related links

For more engaging content, attach graphics to social media posts.  Below are collections of severe weather related graphics and content that you can share with the below text.

Hurricane Preparedness Week Daily Themes

May 5-Know Your Hurricane Risk

  • Check with local officials to understand your risk.
  • Search online to find your local emergency management agency to learn more.
  • Sign up for local alerts or download the FEMA app.

May 6-Know Your Evacuation Zone

  • Learn your evacuation zone, route, and an alternate location to stay.
  • Include pets when planning to evacuate.
  • Practice your plan.

May 7-Assemble Disaster Supplies

  • Gather needed supplies for at least 10 days.
  • Don’t forget your specific needs like meds, powered devices, pets etc.
  • Keep cash in your emergency kit.

May 8-Prepare Financially

  • Start an emergency savings fund.
  • Check your insurance coverage to make sure you have enough coverage. 
  • Learn more about flood insurance by visiting: www.floodsmart.gov

May 9-Strengthen Your Home

  • Make sure your home is in good repair and meets local hurricane building codes.
  • Declutter drains and gutters, trim trees, secure loose outdoor items & secure doors.
  • Know a safe location to move your car during a hurricane.

May 10-Help Your Neighbors

  • Get to know your neighbors before an emergency strikes.
  • Make sure they have a plan before and after a hurricane.
  • Exchange contact information

May 11-Make an Emergency Plan

  • Write down your hurricane plan & share it.
  • Make a plan of how you will get in touch with others before, during, and after.
  • Take photos of important documents and store them in a secure place.

Social Media

Hashtags

  • #HurricanePrep
  • #ItOnlyTakesOne
  • #HurricaneStrong

Know Your Hurricane Risk

  • Live on the coast? You are most at risk for extreme winds & flooding from rain & storm surge during a hurricane. #HurricanePrep
  • Live inland? You are at risk for wind, thunderstorms, flooding, & power outages during a hurricane. #HurricanePrep
  • Hurricanes not only result in high winds, but floods, too. If you see a flooded path: Turn Around, Don’t Drown! #HurricanePrep
  • Hurricane watch = conditions possible w/in the next 48 hrs. Learn how to prepare: ready.gov/hurricanes.  #HurricanePrep
  • Hurricane warning = conditions are expected within 36 hrs. Learn how to prepare: ready.gov/hurricanes.  #HurricanePrep
  • Know the risk: Sign up for alerts & warnings to know your local hurricane risk. More info: https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/94715 #HurricanePrep
  • 2 factors of your personal hurricane risk are where you live & your home structure. Learn more: http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/98105   #HurricanePrep

Know Your Evacuation Zone

  • You may have to evacuate quickly due to a hurricane. Learn your evacuation routes & identify where you will stay www.ready.gov/evacuation #HurricanePrep
  • Search online today for local pet-friendly evacuation locations: https://youtu.be/9f98ixT-2I4#HurricanePrep
  • Do not get caught by dangerous flood waters, have an evacuation plan. https://www.ready.gov/evacuating-yourself-and-your-family  #HurricanePrep
  • Hurricanes can cause extensive flood damage in coastal & inland areas- Make a #HurricanePrep plan: ready.gov/hurricanes. 
  • Keep your car’s gas tank at least half full in case you need to quickly evacuate for a #Hurricane. #HurricanePrep
  • Know your community’s local #hurricane evacuation plan and identify several evacuation routes for your location. #HurricanePrep
  • Know before you go: Don’t go off course – follow official local #hurricane evacuation routes. #HurricanePrep
  • It is time to go. If you have been instructed to evacuate, please do so. Listen to local officials to save yourself and your family. #HurricanePrep
  • If you rely on public transportation, contact your local emergency management agency about evacuation procedures before a hurricane. #HurricanePrep
  • Driving through flooded roadways is dangerous. Check out this @NWS PSA to see why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eI6mIlHKrVY. #HurricanePrep

Assemble Disaster Supplies

  • Build emergency supplies by grabbing extra at the store *before* an emergency:  https://youtu.be/Htgqb0pwrlQ #HurricanePrep
  • As part of your family’s emergency kit, include games & toys to keep children entertained. #HurricanePrep
  • Include a hand-crank or battery powered radio in your emergency kit. More tips:  ready.gov/kit.#HurricanePrep
  • During an extended power outage, ATMs & credit card machines may not work. Include extra $ in your emergency kit. #HurricanePrep
  • Store supplies at your common locations (e.g. home, work) in case you need to stay in place during a hurricane. #HurricanePrep
  • Do you have enough batteries? Find out what supplies you should have on hand: ready.gov/kit.#HurricanePrep
  • Gather your #hurricane supplies now, so you will not be tempted to drive on possibly flooded roads. A basic supply list can be found here: ready.gov/kit. #HurricanePrep
  • Keep emergency supplies in your car in case you need to evacuate due to a hurricane. Watch this video for more.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3AnYI4HRlI  #HurricanePrep
  • Hurricane + high winds (frequently) = power loss. Store enough supplies (e.g., food, bottled water) to last at least 3 days – if possible for a week or more. #HurricanePrep

Prepare Financially

  • Part of being prepared is understanding your finances. Does your family have enough savings in case of an emergency? Get more info: www.ready.gov/financial-preparedness #FinancialPrep #HurricanePrep
  • Almost 60 percent of all Americans don’t have $400 in savings according to the Federal Reserve. What will you do in case of disaster? #FinancialPrep
  • Anticipate initial out-of-pocket expenses for lodging, food, gas, and more after a disaster. Are you prepared? #FinancialPrep #HurricanePrep
  • Floods are the nation’s most common and costly natural disaster, causing billions of dollars in damage each year. How are you prepared in case of a disaster?Plan now. Get tips: www.ready.gov/financial-preparedness #HurricanePrep
  • The Emergency Financial First Aid Kit is a tool to help individuals and families at all income levels collect and secure the documentation they would need in case disaster strikes. https://www.ready.gov/financial-preparedness #FinancialPrep
  • Businesses: purchase business-interruption insurance policies to help cover and protect against lost earnings that can occur following a disaster. #FinancialPrep #HurricanePrep
  • Set aside a small amount from each paycheck to go into your savings account.Find more tips to help you manage your money to be prepared for the unexpected: https://www.usa.gov/flec  #HurricanePrep
  • If you want to build up your savings, try putting a small amount in your account the first of every month.  #FinancialPrep #HurricanePrep
  • Save. Save. Save. Your emergency savings can help you get life saving items like food, shelter, and water in an emergency. Saving Tips: https://www.usa.gov/flec #HurricanePrep
  • 48% of people have an emergency fund, which gives them the savings to overcome simple emergencies and possibly ones that may save their life. Get tips to start saving today: https://www.usa.gov/flec#HurricanePrep

Check your insurance coverage

Strengthen your home

  • #HurricanePrep tip: Bring in outdoor furniture & anything else that is not tied down to prevent injury/damage from debris.
  • #HurricanePrep tip: Trim trees & shrubs. High winds can turn branches into projectiles during a storm.
  • Reduce property damage in the event of a hurricane by retrofitting (i.e., reinforcing) the roof, windows, and doors. #HurricanePrep
  • Prepare your property before a #hurricane by installing storm shutters. More mitigation tips at: https://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/30627?id=6938  #HurricanePrep
  • You can act now to reduce potential property damage caused by floodwaters. Use flood damage resistant materials. # HurricanePrep
  • When constructing a new home or upgrading an existing home, consider elevating the structure to better protect against floodwaters and/or storm surge. #HurricanePrep

Check on Your Neighbors

  • Check in with neighbors to see how you can help each other out before and after a storm #HurricanePrep
  • If you run to the store to grab a couple last minute supplies before a storm, check to see if your neighbor needs anything. #HurricanePrep
  • Please share tips with your community for staying safe before, during, & after a hurricane: www.ready.gov/hurricane #HurricanePrep
  • Get to know your neighbors before a storm or an emergency to help out in your community #HurricanePrep
  • Almost half of Americans expect to rely on their neighbors after a disaster. Do you know yours? #HurricanePrep
  • Help your community/neighbors get prepared & trained for an emergency by visiting: www.ready.gov/volunteer #HurricanePrep

Make an Emergency Plan

  • Where will your loved ones be during a hurricane? Make and test your communication plan today. Get all the resources you need:  www.ready.gov/plan  #HurricanePrep
  • Your family’s needs change over time – make sure you have what you need for this year’s #hurricane season www.ready.gov/kit  #HurricanePrep
  • Pick an out of town person for everyone to contact during an emergency. Watch for more tips: https://youtu.be/vw0zxFldUFY#HurricanePrep
  • Disasters don’t plan ahead. You can. Make an emergency plan today. www.ready.gov/make-a-plan#PlanAhead #HurricanePrep
  • Preparing the family for an emergency is as simple as a convo over dinner. Get started with tips from www.ready.gov #HurricanePrep
  • Download a group texting app so your entire crew can keep in touch before, during & after an emergency. #HurricanePrep
  • Don’t forget to include your pets in your family’s emergency plans. Share this 1-minute video: https://youtu.be/BosQtZFv6Jk #HurricanePrep
  • Download, share or print @Readygov’s Pet owner’s planning guide: http://www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/90356 #HurricanePrep
  • Don’t forget to make a plan for large animals & livestock before a disaster. Tips: www.ready.gov/animals #HurricanePrep

Business Emergency Preparedness Social Media Toolkit

How to Use this Toolkit

The Business Emergency Preparedness Social Media Toolkit has safety and preparedness messages you can share on your social media channels. You can either copy these messages directly or customize them to reach your audience.

Businesses Face a Variety of Hazards

  • Natural hazards like floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes.

  • Health hazards such as widespread and serious illnesses like the flu.

  • Human-caused hazards including accidents and acts of violence.

  • Technology-related hazards like power outages and equipment failure.

What You Should know

  • Know what to do before, during, and after a disaster.

  • Identify your risks. Know what disasters are most likely to affect your business.

  • Develop a workplace emergency plan and be sure employees know it.

  • Create a crisis communications plan to keep in contact with customers, suppliers and employees during and after a disaster.

  • Test and practice your preparedness plans.

  • Have emergency supplies available at the workplace.

  • Check your insurance policies to ensure you have enough coverage.

  • Listen to local officials.

Graphics & Outreach Materials

For more engaging content, use a hashtag, include emoji’s, and attach graphics to social media posts.  Below is a collection of graphics you can share with the below text.

Plan Ahead

Crisis Response and Communication

 

WHY SHOULD ORGANIZATIONS CARE ABOUT HURRICANE RISK? Significant portions of the United States are at risk for the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes. It is important that organizations throughout the country, including associations, businesses, and community groups, understand the risks and potential impacts and prepare accordingly. The Ready Business Program for Hurricane and the Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan allow users to take action to protect employees, protect customers, and help ensure business continuity

TORNADO PREPAREDNESS

A tornado is arguably one of the most destructive types of storms imaginable.

Unlike a hurricane or tropical storm, a tornado may develop almost without warning, appearing within minutes and leaving little time to react accordingly.

Winds can get up to and exceed 200 mph causing enormous damage in its path.

Therefore, the importance of being prepared beforehand cannot be conveyed strongly enough.

The following is a checklist to prepare your business in the event of such an occurrence.

✓ Before the Tornado

 Have a weather alert radio in the office.

 Have a plan to provide emergency notification (warning system) to all employees, clients, visitors and customers in an emergency.

 Put your crisis management plan in writing and give it to all employees.

 Conduct drills regularly to prepare employees for the real thing

 When you establish your timeline for workplace preparation and closure, consider that employees will need to prepare their families and take care of personal matters as well.

Allow enough time for them to execute their personal preparedness plans.

 Identify critical employees, and make sure they understand what is expected of them during a disaster.

For example, you may need certain employees responsible for IT functions to work during a disaster to protect and reestablish your technology systems.

If you need those employees to work remotely, make travel, hotel, and meal arrangements in advance, and ensure they know what equipment and support they will need to perform their duties.

 Develop a plan to allow your payroll, benefits, and HR functions to operate during a disaster, after a disaster, or during any period in which access to your workplace is restricted.

 If employees will be required to return to the workplace to assist in the recovery process before all services are restored, obtain an adequate supply of water, nonperishable food, first-aid supplies, generators, cleaning supplies, batteries, flashlights, and other necessities.

 Update your employee contact information regularly and at the beginning of any season during which natural disasters are more likely.

 Look for the following danger signs: dark, often greenish sky, large hail, dark, low-lying clouds, and/or loud roar (similar to a freight train).

TORNADO PREPAREDNESS

✓ During the Tornado

 Move to an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor.

If possible, get under a heavy piece of furniture.

 Stay away from windows.

 Mobile homes/ work trailers, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes and should be abandoned.

 Go to a pre-designated shelter area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or the lowest building level.

If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away fromcorners, windows, doors, and outside walls.

Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside.

Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect your head and neck. Do not open windows.

✓ After a Tornado

 Ensure the site is safe for re-entry. A third-party inspector may be necessary to achieve proper safety protocol.

 Communication following a disaster is critical.

In advance, establish a communication plan that will work regardless of the nature of the disaster.

For example, consider setting up a toll-free number or website, make sure they are operated out of areas that aren’t disasterprone and are located away from your workplace, and give employees instructions on when, how, and what to communicate through those methods following a disaster.

✓ Your Employees

 Ensure you have an emergency communication plan in place prior to the storm, evacuation, or threat.

 Have all employees, vendors, and client contact information on hand.

 During evacuation have a central point of contact for all employees, and ensure you know where your people are located.

 During evacuation consider your phones lines- redirection to cell phones, answering service, Google Voice, or Agility lines could be critical.

 Following the tornado, notify all critical people of next steps, based on damage


 

 

TopicResourceTips
Hurricanes
Winter Weather
Earthquakes
Tornadoes
Wildfires
Floods
Cyber Security

The Small Business Administration also offers emergency preparedness training with a self-paced overview of SBA’s disaster assistance programs, resources and regulations.

Get financial assistance after a disaster

When a disaster hits your small business, first contact FEMA to apply for financial assistance. They can provide money for housing along with other personal expenses including food, clothing and medicine.

The SBA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture provide low-interest loans for damaged and destroyed assets in a declared disaster. These include repair and replacement costs for real estate, personal property, machinery, equipment, inventory, and business assets.

Disaster assistance loans

Other sources of disaster aid

Disaster unemployment assistance helps individual employees while they’re unemployed due to a disaster, and flood recovery assistance can help workers displaced by flooding.

Businesses in federally declared disaster areas could qualify for special tax provisions for financial recovery. The Farm Service Agency also provides a disaster assistance guide for farmers and ranchers after natural disasters.

Disaster cleanup

Take precautions to avoid injury or illness occurring in the cleanup process following a disaster. The wide range of hazards range from downed power lines and contaminated waters to hidden molds and toxins.

Disasters are magnified by their consequences on health and health services, so the Center for Disease Control (CDC) serves as an important resource through its Health Studies Branch. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published cleanup tips specifically for hazards during natural disaster recoveries.

If you encounter hazardous material spills or discharges, call the National Response Center, and contact the National Pesticide Center if applicable. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) outlines reporting for spills and environmental violations.

More assistance

Visit FEMA to find emergency management agencies in your state.

For more emergency preparedness advice, visit ready.gov/business or contact SBA’s Disaster Assistance Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

You can also receive local business counseling to determine the best way to prepare for emergencies and the next step when disaster strikes.

Disaster Loan Assistance

Federal Disaster Loans for Businesses, Private Nonprofits, Homeowners, and Renters

Home and Personal Property Loans

If you are in a declared disaster area and have experienced damage to your home or personal property, you may be eligible for financial assistance from the SBA — even if you do not own a business. As a homeowner, renter and/or personal property owner, you may apply to the SBA for a loan to help you recover from a disaster.

Loan Amounts and Use

Homeowners may apply for up to $200,000 to replace or repair their primary residence. The loans may not be used to upgrade homes or make additions, unless required by local building code. If you make improvements that help prevent the risk of future property damage caused by a similar disaster, you may be eligible for up to a 20 percent loan amount increase above the real estate damage, as verified by the SBA.

In some cases, SBA can refinance all or part of a previous mortgage when the applicant does not have credit available elsewhere and has suffered substantial disaster damage not covered by insurance.

Renters and homeowners may borrow up to $40,000 to replace or repair personal property — such as clothing, furniture, cars and appliances — damaged or destroyed in a disaster.

Eligibility and Terms

Secondary homes or vacation properties are not eligible for these loans. However, qualified rental properties may be eligible for assistance under the SBA business disaster loan program.

Proceeds from insurance coverage on your home or property will be deducted from the total damage estimate to determine the eligible loan amount. The SBA is not permitted to duplicate any benefits.

For applicants unable to obtain credit elsewhere, the interest rate will not exceed 4 percent. For those who can obtain credit elsewhere, the interest rate will not exceed 8 percent. The SBA will determine whether an applicant can obtain credit elsewhere. SBA disaster loans are offered with up to 30-year terms.

Home loans for more than $25,000 in Presidential and Agency declarations must be secured with collateral to the extent possible. The SBA will ask the applicant for available collateral, but will not decline a loan for lack of collateral. A first or second mortgage on the damaged real estate is commonly used as collateral for an SBA disaster loan.

How to Apply

You can apply online for an SBA disaster assistance loan. SBA will send an inspector to estimate the cost of your damage once you have completed and returned your loan application.

You must submit the completed loan application and a signed and dated IRS Form 4506-T giving permission for the IRS to provide SBA your tax return information.

For additional information, please contact the SBA disaster assistance customer service center. Call 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Economic Injury Disaster Loans

 

If you have suffered substantial economic injury and are one of the following types of businesses located in a declared disaster area, you may be eligible for an SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL): 

  • Small Business
  • Small agricultural cooperative
  • Most private nonprofit organizations

Loan Amounts and Use 


Substantial economic injury means the business is unable to meet its obligations and to pay its ordinary and necessary operating expenses. EIDLs provide the necessary working capital to help small businesses survive until normal operations resume after a disaster. 

The SBA can provide up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses that could have been met had the disaster not occurred. Your loan amount will be based on your actual economic injury and your company’s financial needs, regardless of whether the business suffered any property damage. 

Eligibility and Terms 

The interest rate on EIDLs will not exceed 4 percent per year. The term of these loans will not exceed 30 years. The repayment term will be determined by your ability to repay the loan. 

EIDL assistance is available only to small businesses when SBA determines they are unable to obtain credit elsewhere. 

A business may qualify for both an EIDL and a physical disaster loan. The maximum combined loan amount is $2 million. 

How to Apply 

You can apply online for an SBA disaster assistance loan

You must submit the completed loan application and a signed and dated IRS Form 4506-T giving permission for the IRS to provide SBA your tax return information. 

For additional information, please contact the SBA disaster assistance customer service center. Call 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Military Reservists Economic Injury Loans

 
The Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan (MREIDL) provides funds to help an eligible small business meet its ordinary and necessary operating expenses that it could have met, but is unable to, because an essential employee was called-up to active duty in his or her role as a military reservist. 

Loan Amounts and Use 
The maximum MREIDL loan amount is $2 million. The amount of each loan is limited to the actual economic injury as calculated by SBA. The amount is also limited by business interruption insurance and whether the business and/or its owners have sufficient funds to operate. If a business is a major source of employment, SBA has authority to waive the $2 million statutory limit. 

The purpose of MREIDL loans is not to cover lost income or lost profits. MREIDL funds cannot be used in lieu of regular commercial debt, to refinance long-term debt, or to expand the business. 

Eligibility and Terms 
Businesses with the financial capacity to fund their own recovery are not eligible for MREIDL assistance. Federal law requires SBA to determine whether a business has credit available elsewhere — that is, if credit in an amount needed to accomplish full recovery is available from non-government sources without creating an undue financial hardship. 

The filing period for MREIDL assistance begins on the date the essential employee receives a notice of expected call-up and ends one year after the essential employee is discharged or released from active duty. 

Collateral is required for all MREIDL loans more than $50,000. SBA accepts real estate as collateral when it is available. SBA will not decline a loan for lack of collateral, but will require the borrower to pledge collateral that is available. 

The MREIDL interest rate is 4 percent and has loan repayment terms up to 30 years. SBA determines the term of each loan in accordance with the borrower’s ability to repay. 

How to Apply 
You can apply online for an SBA MREIDL. You must submit the completed loan application and a signed and dated IRS Form 4506-T giving permission for the IRS to provide SBA your tax return information. 

For additional information, please contact the SBA disaster assistance customer service center. Call 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Farm Loan Programs

By providing access to credit, FSA’s Farm Loan Programs offer opportunities to family-sized farmers and ranchers to:

  • Start, improve, expand, transition, market, and strengthen family farming and ranching operations
  • Beginning farmers, racial and ethnic minority farmers and women producers 
  • Value-added, direct sale, organic, and specialty crop operations
  • Young People actively involved in agricultural youth organizations needing financial assistance for income-producing, educational, agricultural projects
  • Urban farmers and roof-top producers
  • Operations using alternative farming methods such as hydroponics, aeroponics, vertical farming, and freight container farming
In the News

New Farmers.gov Discovery Tool Helps Producers Find a Farm Loan to Fit Their Needs

Veterans Have Opportunity to Grow With USDA and Farming Resources

NRCS Releases Updated SoilWeb App 2.0

Manage Farm Loans Online


Current Interest Rates
ProgramInterest Rates
Farm Operating- Direct3.250%
Farm Operating – Microloan3.250%
Farm Ownership – Direct3.875%
Farm Ownership – Microloan3.875%
Farm Ownership – Direct, Joint Financing2.500%
Farm Ownership – Down Payment1.500%
Emergency Loan – Amount of Actual Loss3.750%
Effective as of July 1, 2019

Continue below to learn more about Available Farm LoansTargeted Loan Audiences, and Specialty Loans.


Farmers.gov
  • Farmers.gov Fact Sheet for agricultural producers with farm loans
  • View Loan and Financial Information
  • Find Local FSA Service Center
  • Access educational materials, business tools, self-service applications, and more
Farmers.gov Logo

Your Guide to FSA Farm Loans

This guidebook simplifies information on the types of farm loans available; how to apply for a guaranteed loan, direct loan, or land contract guarantee; what you can expect once you submit your application; and most importantly, your rights and responsibilities as an FSA customer.

Preparedness Planning for Your Business

Businesses and their staff face a variety of hazards:

  • Natural hazards like floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes.
  • Health hazards such as widespread and serious illnesses like the flu.
  • Human-caused hazards including accidents and acts of violence.
  • Technology-related hazards like power outages and equipment failure.

There is much that a business leader can do to prepare his or her organization for the most likely hazards. The Ready Business program helps business leaders make a preparedness plan to get ready for these hazards.

Ready Business Toolkits

The Ready Business Toolkit series includes hazard-specific versions for earthquake, hurricane, inland flooding, power outage, and severe wind/tornado. Toolkits offer business leaders a step-by-step guide to build preparedness within an organization. Each toolkit contains the following sections:

  • Identify Your Risk
  • Develop A Plan
  • Take Action
  • Be Recognized and Inspire Others

Business Emergency Preparedness Social Media Toolkit

The Business Emergency Preparedness Social Media Toolkit has safety and preparedness messages you can share on your social media channels.

Link to Business Emergency Prepardness Social Media Toolkit

Earthquake “QuakeSmart” Toolkit

Unlike other natural disasters, earthquakes occur without warning and cannot be predicted. Most of the United States is at some risk for earthquakes, not just the West Coast, so it is important that you understand your risk, develop preparedness and mitigation plans, and take action.

Link to QuakeSmart Ready Business Toolkit

Link to Spanish Ready Business QuakeSmart Toolkit

Hurricane Toolkit

Many parts of the United States, including Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, Hawaii, parts of the Southwest, Puerto Rico, the Pacific Coast, and the U.S. Virgin Islands and territories in the Pacific may be directly affected by heavy rains, strong winds, wind-driven rain, coastal and inland floods, tornadoes, and coastal storm surges resulting from tropical storms and hurricanes. The Ready Business Hurricane Toolkit helps leaders take action to protect employees, protect customers, and help ensure business continuity as well.

Link to Hurricane Ready Business Toolkit

Link to Spanish Ready Business Hurricane Toolkit

Inland Flooding Toolkit

Most of the United States is at some risk for flooding, so it is important that organizations, businesses, and community groups understand the potential impacts.

Link to Inland Flooding Ready Business Toolkit

Link to Spanish Ready Business Inland Flooding Toolkit

Power Outage Toolkit

While a Power Outage may not seem as dangerous as a tornado or earthquake, they can still cause damage to homes, businesses and communities. Power Outages cost the U.S. economy $20 billion and $55 billion annually and continue to increase each year (CRS, 2012).

Link to Power Outage Ready Business Toolkit

Link to Spanish Ready Business Power Outages Toolkit

Severe Wind/Tornado Toolkit

It is not just in Tornado Alley. Most of the United States is at some risk for severe wind and tornadoes

Link to Severe Wind Tornado Ready Business Toolkit

Link to Spanish Ready Business Severe Wind Tornado Toolkit

Ready Business Workshop “How-To” Guide

This “How-To” guide explains how to plan for and deliver effective Ready Business workshops.

Link to How-To Ready Business Toolkit

Ready Business Videos

The Ready Business Program provides leaders with the tools to plan, take action, and become a Ready Business. The program addresses several key parts of getting ready, including Staff, Surroundings, Physical space, Building Construction, Systems, and Service. These videos briefly explain each concept.

Staff/Employee Management

Physical Surroundings

Physical Space

Building Construction

Systems

Community Service

INLAND FLOODING

https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/1510690310680-1e6c4874b251c3022ac4b57b0369e2da/Inland_Flooding_Ready_Business_Toolkit_Interactive_Final_508.pdf  

WHY SHOULD ORGANIZATIONS CARE ABOUT INLAND FLOODING RISK?

Most of the United States is at some risk for flooding, so it is important that organizations, including associations, businesses, and community groups, understand the potential impacts.

The Ready Business Program
for Inland Flooding and the Preparedness and Mitigation Project Plan allow users to take action to protect employees, protect customers, and help ensure business continuity as well.

NATURAL DISASTER IMPACT

IMMEDIATE

ONE YEAR LATER

THREE YEARS LATER

40%

OF SMALL BUSINESSES WON’T REOPEN

25%

MORE SMALL BUSINESSES WILL CLOSE

75%

OF BUSINESSES WITHOUT A CONTINUITY PLAN WILL FAIL

Introduction

Should your organization be concerned about flooding? In most instances, yes. Everywhere in the United States is at some risk for flooding, so it is important that you understand your risk, develop preparedness and mitigation plans, and take action. Doing so will not only increase the safety of employees and customers, but it will help you remain in business after disasters such as flooding strike. Maintaining business continuity is important for you, and when you are able to continue operations after a disaster, you will improve your community’s ability to recover as well.

THE READY BUSINESS PROGRAM MOVES ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERS THROUGH A STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS TO:

✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

Identify Your Risk
Develop a Plan
Take Action
Be Recognized and Inspire Others

Following these steps in the Ready Business Program as a part of your overall business continuity planning will help protect assets (people, property, operations); sustain the capability to provide goods and services to customers and/or supply chain; maintain cash flow; preserve competitive advantage and reputation; and provide the ability to meet legal, regulatory, financial, and contractual obligations.

Nonprofit organizations can also benefit from the Ready Business Program as business continuity will protect staff, clients, and property while allowing operations to continue.

Experts estimate that 75% of businesses without continuity planning will fail within three years of
a disaster. The Ready Business Program offers information to complete continuity planning, including resources from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Business Continuity Plan.

Business Continuity Plan

The Plan will be distributed to members of the business continuity team and management. A master copy of the document should be maintained by the business continuity team leader. Provide print copies of this plan within the room designated as the emergency operations center (EOC). Multiple copies should be stored within the EOC to ensure that team members can quickly review roles, responsibilities, tasks, and reference information when the team is activated.

Emergency Preparedness Resources for Businesses (21)

Cover Image for Emergency Preparedness Resources for Businesses album
When business is disrupted, it can cost money. Lost revenues plus extra expenses means reduced profits. Insurance does not cover all costs and cannot replace customers that defect to the competition. A business continuity plan to continue business is essential. Ready Business will assist businesses in developing a preparedness program by providing tools to create a plan that addresses the impact of many hazards.

very Business Should Have A Plan. 12-page Booklet

If businesses are ready to survive and recover, the nation and our economy are more secure. America’s businesses form the backbone of the nation’s economy; small businesses alone account for more than 99% of all companies with employees, employ 50% of all private sector workers and provide nearly 45% of the nation’s payroll. A commitment to planning today will help support employees, customers, the community, the local economy and even the country. It also protects your business investment and gives your company a better chance for survival.
 
 

Every Business Should Have A Plan. 12-page Booklet

If businesses are ready to survive and recover, the nation and our economy are more secure. America’s businesses form the backbone of the nation’s economy; small businesses alone account for more than 99% of all companies with employees, employ 50% of all private sector workers and provide nearly 45% of the nation’s payroll. A commitment to planning today will help support employees, customers, the community, the local economy and even the country. It also protects your business investment and gives your company a better chance for survival.
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